Friday, June 29, 2012

Grandmother Bloggers Know Best. Period.

I am beginning to realize that anything worth knowing can be found on a blog written by a grandmother. This rich source of reliable and straight-forward information has never disappointed me. One example is last week's desperate search to identify alien-looking nodules that began to appear on our pumpkin vines as they matured. I did recognize newly sprouted  little "curlicues" that accompanied them. Those are supposed to be there. I have seen them gracing pumpkins on illustrated Thanksgiving Day cards! But what the heck are those extra little knobs that are definitely not leaf clusters? Could they possibly be flower buds? Surely there are educational sites that would enlighten and assure me that, indeed, our vines are crawling down the correct path to a healthy fall harvest........




Typed in "stages of pumpkin growth." Nothing. Well, not unless you want to count the agriculture site that advised me to approach my plants at dawn and force them to pollinate one another using a paint brush. Eww! That just doesn't sound ethical to me! I would never do that to our pumpkins! Isn't that what God made bees for?

And then I remembered. Grandma blogs! One I follow and visit regularly is the sweet and simply told journey through life of "Grandma Kc" and her beloved granddaughter, Amara. Several years ago that happy little pair attempted to grow pumpkins in a large garden pot. The Summer of the Pumpkins is richly illustrated with striking close up photos of plants at various stages. Finally! The exact scientific info I needed! On a grandma blog! But wait! There's more! The Summer of the Sunflowers followed that post, because sadly, "pickable pumpkins" were never meant to be for grandma and Amara. God had other plans for them. Instead, they were blessed beyond their wildest expectations with a robust crop of sunflowers so huge and aggressive that grandpa described them in a follow up comment as "creepy!" (Yes, these are fun people!) Feast your eyes on the gorgeous photos of these flowers as they grow up, up and away and become tall enough to peer inside the house while the "creeped out" gardeners hide deep within and wonder what they unleashed by plunking those fertile seeds beneath the soil! Wow! That is gardening success I sincerely admire!




Thank you, Grandma Kc! Now I know that what we coaxed forth are pumpkin blossoms. They began to burst open yesterday and the kids enjoyed examining them through magnifying lenses today. I have also handed grandpa a sunflower seed packet and asked him to plant them for us. Nothing yet, but it will be interesting to see what happens. Maybe the final score will be pumpkins for us and sunflowers for Amara!








Are YOU a grandma?
Because, if you are, I think you're very smart!

12 comments:

  1. Love this post! glad your seedlings are doing so well after all. And yes, grandmothers know a LOT!!! Some people actually listen to us too ;) Thanks for mentioning my directory!

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  2. What a great post! Amara and I love that you included us! I can't wait to see if your pumpkins grow and to see lots more pictures. I should send you some of our giant sunflower seeds so you could see how California sunflowers do in Michigan! Happy Gardening and Happy Grandkidding!

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  3. Ha ha I go to Grandma KC for Tech Help too....:)

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    1. If it wasn't for Grandma Kc's guidance my links would go to all kinds of crazy places...like maybe even the IRS! Who knows?

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  4. My spell check hasn't been working either. I usually write in Word then copy and paste into blogger. I have some major issues with spelling, and grammar as I am sure most you have noticed :) So, I need to use Word for the extra help. Thanks for linking with me!

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  5. I've about given up on gardening for two reasons. One, when we travel, it's a pain to get someone to look after the plants. Two, the brutal heat down here in Texas means that plants have to be watered and babied through much of the summer. For the meantime, I'm just enjoying a few house plants and enjoying everyone else's photos of their gardening successes.

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  6. I have the same issues that Susan mentions. South Texas is just too hot and dry for gardening once summer arrives, which is usually in late April. I have reduced my garden to herbs and succulents which I grown in flower pots that can be placed in the shade. A tornado earlier this year took out most of my herbs, but my sweet basil, parsley, and rosemary are thriving.

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  7. I'm in the same boat! It's way to hot here too. I do better with veggies in the winter. I told my neighbor the other day that I'm thinking of going native with plants because I simple don't have the time and energy anymore; but oh will I miss it! Can't wait to see your pumpkins!

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  8. Oh, yeah! Grandma Kc is one of my favorite grandmas (and people) ever! Such a joy to see you feel the same. Grandmas are indeed the smartest.

    I have no green thumb and my forever failing pumpkins are proof. But every year I have faith I can make it happen, and this year is no different (despite the unprecedented heat in Colorado that's doing all it can to make me fail once again).

    Thank you for joining GRAND Social!

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  9. You're right - grandma's always right...every time I need garden help I call my grandmother - I'm lucky to still have her :)

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  10. Hi J. Planting pumpkins is a great way to get children involved in gardening and nature. I love the pumpkin blossoms. Do you have pumpkins yet?

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    1. I wish we did! They got as large as onions and then the deer ate them! I'm just not a gardener!

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